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Ancient Egypt

In Ancient Egypt, they did not have the same concept of virginity that many cultures do today. And according to one creation myth, the first god produced a generation of deities by way of masturbation. Some sources claim that the Pharaoh would mimic this event by ejaculating into the Nile.
Birth control made of acacia gum, crocodile dung and other materials were also used at this time.
Ancient Egypt

Ancient Greece

Sexual acts between an adult male and a teenage boy, or pederasty, were common in the Archaic and Classical periods. It was viewed as an educational experience. This photo shows a painting of an intercrural act, in which penetration is achieved through closed thighs.
Ancient Greece
Louvre

Trobriand Islanders, Papua, New Guinea

Around seven years old, Trobiand chldren are encouraged to tease each other in a seductive manner. After four of five years, when they become adolescents, they begin to seriously pursue sexual partners, which they can change often if they so chose. Women are empowered to pursue or turn down a lover.
Instead of a traditional marriage ceremony, the couples are considered married when they eat together. Instead of leaving her lover's house before sunrise, a young woman will stay there and wait for her mother to arrive with cooked yams.
Trobriand Islanders, Papua, New Guinea
Terry Allen / PNG

Mardudjara Aborigines, Australia

Between 10 to 12 years old, boys experience their transition into adulthood. Around this age, he is knocked dead, symbolically, by getting a front tooth knocked out and his septum pierced.
Afterward, he is taken elsewhere where he is circumcised. He must swallow his own foreskin after the procedure is complete. As part of the next step, he goes hunting until he can return with food.
Mardudjara Aborigines, Australia
JuTa / Wikimedia

The Sambia People, Papua, New Guinea

In order to make the transition from boys to men, males in the Sambia tribe go through a six-stage process starting as early as six years old. During masculinization, they are taught how to become warriors, and an essential part of that is detachment from women, including their mothers.
Another key part of their growth is the ingestion of semen from other men beginning in the first stage. This is not viewed as homosexual but rather as a way to help them grow.
The process ends about 10 to 15 years later when he fathers a child.
The Sambia People, Papua, New Guinea
Getty

The Wodaabe or Bororo, Africa

The Woodaabe is a subgroup of the Fulani ethnic group, and migrations can be found in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Niger and Nigeria. They're well known for their elaborate makeup and decorative clothing.
Here's a look at the annual week-long Guérewol festival, described by some sources as a beauty pageant, in which young men exhibit their beauty and talent of dance in hopes to capture the attention of a marriageable woman.
A jury of three women chooses the most attractive man as the winner. They each pick one for an affair or marriage. In the process, it is possible for couples to break up in order for newly chosen ones to emerge. Sometimes, a man may end up with two wives.
The Wodaabe or Bororo, Africa
Getty

Saut-d'Eau, Haiti

Saut-d'Eau, or "waterfall" in French,' is also the name of a commune in Haiti. Every July, locals participate in the Vodou festival of Saut d'Eau at a sacred waterfall. It is considered by many to be a fertility festival. Because procreation is a primary focus, women are free to have open sexual relations for those three days.
Saut-d'Eau, Haiti
Lexey Swall Photography

Ethnic Tibetan Communities, Nepal

Polyandry, or wife-sharing, exists in ethnic Tibetan communities Nepal, but the custom seems to be dying out. Advantages of polyandry include natural population control and ensured companionship for the wife when one husband goes out for business or dies. Some predict that the system will die out completely.
Ethnic Tibetan Communities, Nepal
Terra Project Photographers

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